Friday, June 13, 2008

Rowling's Harvard Speech

On this wonderful day when we are gathered together to celebrate your academic success, I have decided to talk to you about the benefits of failure. And as you stand on the threshold of what is sometimes called 'real life', I want to extol the crucial importance of imagination.

Rowling's Harvard Speech Doesn't Entrance All : NPR.


I had to read J. K. Rowling’s (famous author of the Harry Potter series) speech to Harvard’s graduating class of 2008 twice to really appreciate it. The first theme of her speech was on the benefits of failure.



So why do I talk about the benefits of failure? Simply because failure meant a stripping away of the inessential. I stopped pretending to myself that I was anything other than what I was, and began to direct all my energy into finishing the only work that mattered to me. Had I really succeeded at anything else, I might never have found the determination to succeed in the one arena I believed I truly belonged. I was set free, because my greatest fear had already been realized, and I was still alive, and I still had a daughter whom I adored, and I had an old typewriter and a big idea. And so rock bottom became the solid foundation on which I rebuilt my life.


The second theme was on the importance of imagination, not only for works of literature but to feel for those who are less fortunate than us and hopefully extend a helping hand. 



You might think that I chose my second theme, the importance of imagination, because of the part it played in rebuilding my life, but that is not wholly so. Though I will defend the value of bedtime stories to my last gasp, I have learned to value imagination in a much broader sense. Imagination is not only the uniquely human capacity to envision that which is not, and therefore the fount of all invention and innovation. In its arguably most transformative and revelatory capacity, it is the power that enables us to empathize with humans whose experiences we have never shared.


She ends with an insightful Roman wisdom.



As is a tale, so is life: not how long it is, but how good it is, is what matters.

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